Submissions

Online Submissions

Already have a Username/Password for The Health & Fitness Journal of Canada?
Go to Login

Need a Username/Password?
Go to Registration

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

 

Author Guidelines

AUTHOR GUIDELINES

The manuscript must be single-spaced using Cambria or Arial 12-point font, employing italics (rather than underlining (except with URL addresses). The manuscript must be in a Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format, and not a PDF format.

The manuscript should have margins of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and be single-spaced throughout. The typical manuscript length is a maximum of 20 pages including references, figures, tables, and acknowledgements. All illustrations, figures, and tables must be placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end. Please submit one file containing the text, references, figures, and tables.

All manuscripts (other than books reviews, editorials, and letters to the editor) must contain a title page (pg. 1), an abstract (pg. 2), an introduction (pg. 3), methodology, results, discussion, conclusions, acknowledgements, qualifications (of authors), and references. All pages (including the title page) should be numbered consecutively.

Text Guidelines

Language

English is the language of publication for this journal. Authors who speak English as a second language are encouraged to get assistance from someone with expertise in writing in English and publishing in English-language scientific journals.

Authors are required to use nonsexist language (see American Psychologist 30:682-684, 1975). Authors should avoid the excessive usage of acronyms. It is recommended that up to three acronyms be used per manuscript. All acronyms should be defined upon first appearance in the text.

Title Page

The title page should contain:

  • ‪The full title of the paper.
  • ‪All authors (full names) listed in the desired order of appearance on the printed work.
  • ‪The name and contact information for the corresponding author (mailing address, telephone, fax, and e-mail).
  • ‪The institutional affiliation(s) for each author as established by the use of corresponding superscript numbers.
  • ‪A running title consisting of no more than 45 characters (including spaces).

Title

The title should be no more than 85 characters including spaces. The title should be brief and informative.

Abstract

An abstract is required for every submission to the Health & Fitness Journal of Canada (with the exception of book reviews, editorials, and letters to the editor). All abstracts should be 250 words or less (including numbers, abbreviations, and symbols). Abstracts should be structured with background, purpose, methods, results and conclusion sections. Reference citations are not permitted in the abstract. Six (6) to ten (10) key words should follow the abstract. These key words should not repeat phrases from the title.

Introduction

In the introduction, the author(s) must introduce the topic and discuss its relevance. The author(s) must state clearly the purpose and hypothesis (where applicable) of the work. The introduction should be approximately 2-3 paragraphs and well cited. All papers that present original research findings must be hypothesis driven (i.e., contain a clearly defined hypothesis at the end of the introduction).

Methods

The strength of any manuscript is in the ability to reproduce the experimental conditions and findings. As such, sufficient detail must be provided in the methods. 

In the methods section the author(s) must present clearly the topic information, describe the experimental conditions (where applicable), include written informed consent and ethical approval statements (where applicable), identify clearly the methods, equipment, and procedures utilized (with appropriate referencing), identify possible limitations in the experimental design and/or methodologies employed, identify clearly the statistical methods used (where applicable), denote statistical significance when present (where applicable), and provide sample size calculations (where appropriate). 

Results

It is important that the author(s) limit the results section to the questions posed in the introduction. This section should be concise, yet provide enough information for the reader to have a clear understanding of the key findings. The findings should be presented in the text, tables or figures. The presentation of the same data in tables and figures is not permitted. No discussion of the results is required. 

Tables and Figures

The tables should not duplicate the text or each other. Figures should be computer generated with clearly labelled axes and legends. Each figure and table should be given a title in numerical order according to its appearance within the text (e.g., Figure 1, Figure 2, etc.). Programs such as Microsoft Excel™ and Sigma Plot™ can be used and imported directly into the Word document. All statistics must include mean and standard deviations. Authors are required to submit all materials in one single file (including text, figures, and references).

Discussion

This section should include a brief discussion of the results of the article. Results should be discussed as they relate to the available literature. This includes a well-referenced discussion of the findings in the context of other findings in the field. The discussion should be limited to the main contributions of the study to the field.

The first paragraph of the discussion should contain an outline of the innovative contributions of the work.

Conclusions

All manuscripts require a succinct summary statement regarding the overall conclusions of the work. The conclusions should summarize, but not repeat the findings of the discussion. All conclusions must be supported directly by the findings of the study.

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements (written in third person) should recognize the contributions of individuals who contributed substantively to the paper but did not meet the minimal requirements for inclusion as a co-author (as outlined below).

Authorship Requirements

The Health & Fitness Journal of Canada has established authorship requirements that are consistent with the field and manuscripts sent to biomedical journals. For an individual to be included on a paper they must have participated sufficiently in the work to take responsibility for the content of the manuscript. Authors must also have 1) played a significant role in the writing and/or revision of the manuscript, 2) made significant contributions to the conception and design of the study and/or the interpretation of the data, and 3) provided final approval of the version to be published. Others that contributed to the work may be included in the acknowledgements.

It is important to highlight that the collection of data, the general supervision of data collection, and/or the acquisition of funding does not justify authorship. Individuals who received remuneration for their work also are not required to be listed as co-authors. The authors determine the order of authorship.

Qualifications

Each author is asked to provide a summary of his or her education and certifications. An example is provided:

The author qualifications are as follows: Darren E. R. Warburton MSc, PhD, HFFC CEP Shannon S. D. Bredin MSc, PhD, HFFC CEP

Referencing Style (Effective December 1, 2010)

In a continual process of attempting to make the submission of papers easy for authors, our editorial team has attempted to find a referencing style that is consistent with our previous editions, and that meets the needs of our readers and authors. After two years of reviewing and publishing papers, we have realized that the use of standardized referencing styles will facilitate the submission process for authors. We have therefore chosen to use a modified version of the APA 5th referencing style. The minor changes that have been made to this style (for our journal) are identified below. An ens file is also available upon request for those that use Endnote.

The author is responsible for ensuring the accuracy of each reference. It is recommended that authors use Endnote (Version 8 and later) referencing to facilitate the revision and publication of papers. If you are using Endnote, please make sure to turn off the “Cite While You Write” feature.

Each reference must be cited in text using the surnames of the author(s) and the corresponding year (Gledhill and Jamnik, 1992; Green et al., 2002; Shephard, 2001). If the author list has more than two authors, list only the first author followed by “et al.,” (Green et al., 2002; Katzmarzyk, 2008). In instances, where a first author has more than one reference in the same year use the letter “a”, “b”, “c” after the year to distinguish the references (Shephard, 1992a; Shephard, 1992b).  

It is recommended that each reference have digital object identifiers (DOIs) and/or uniform resource locators (URLs) to facilitate the electronic location of references. These unique identifiers should be placed after each corresponding reference.

References must appear in alphabetical order on a separate page following the acknowledgements. All authors’ names should be included in the reference list.

Using the modified APA 5th style the in text referencing looks as follows:

(Green et al., 2002; Katzmarzyk, 2008; Shephard, 2001)

(Raman and Allard, 2007)

(Bouchard et al., 2007; Bouchard and Shephard, 1994)

(Canadian Diabetes Association, 2007; Card, 1996)

(World Health Organization, 1998)

Changes Made to APA 5th Style

  • Citations: To Differentiate Ambiguous Citations
    • De-select add more authors until citation is unique.
    • Keep other options.
    • Citations: Author Lists
      • Change the author separator from & to and
      • Change to If more than 3 authors list 1 and abbreviate with et al.,
      • Citatations: Name Format
        • De-select “Use initials only for primary authors with the same name”
        • Bibliography: Templates
          • Add DOI and URL information for Journal Articles
            • `DOI: `DOI|. `URL: `URL|.
            • Bibliography
              • Change the author separator from & to and
              • List all authors in a paper.
              • Change the editor separator from & to and

Example Reference List

References

Bouchard, C., Blair, S. N., and Haskell, W. L. (2007). Physical activity and health. Champaign, Ill.: Human Kinetics.

Bouchard, C., and Shephard, R. J. (1994). Physical activity fitness and health: the model and key concepts. In C. Bouchard, R. J. Shephard and T. Stephens (Eds.), Physical activity fitness and health: International proceedings and consensus statement (pp. 77-88). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Canadian Diabetes Association. (2007). The prevalence and cost of diabetes.   Retrieved September 3, 2007, from http://www.diabetes.ca/Section_About/prevalence.asp

Card, N. (1996). Validation of a new double-inert gas non-rebreathe method for the determination of cardiac output. Unpublished Masters of Science, York University, Toronto.

Green, B. B., McAfee, T., Hindmarsh, M., Madsen, L., Caplow, M., and Buist, D. (2002). Effectiveness of telephone support in increasing physical activity levels in primary care patients. Am J Prev Med, 22(3), 177-183. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=11897462.

Katzmarzyk, P. T. (2008). Obesity and physical activity among Aboriginal Canadians. Obesity (Silver Spring), 16(1), 184-190. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18223633.

Raman, M., and Allard, J. P. (2007). Parenteral nutrition related hepato-biliary disease in adults. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 32(4), 646-654. DOI:h07-056 [pii] 10.1139/h07-056. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17622278.

Shephard, R. J. (2001). Absolute versus relative intensity of physical activity in a dose-response context. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 33(6 Suppl), S400-418; discussion S419-420. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=11427764.

World Health Organization. (1998). Promoting Active Living in and through Schools: Policy Statement and Guidelines for Action. May 1998. Esbjerg, Denmark: World Health Organization.

Journal Articles:

Single Author

Shephard, R. J. (2001). Absolute versus relative intensity of physical activity in a dose-response context. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 33(6 Suppl), S400-418; discussion S419-420. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=11427764.

Multiple Authors

Green, B. B., McAfee, T., Hindmarsh, M., Madsen, L., Caplow, M., and Buist, D. (2002). Effectiveness of telephone support in increasing physical activity levels in primary care patients. Am J Prev Med, 22(3), 177-183. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=11897462.

Journal Article with DOI and URL

Raman, M., and Allard, J. P. (2007). Parenteral nutrition related hepato-biliary disease in adults. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab, 32(4), 646-654. DOI:h07-056 [pii] 10.1139/h07-056. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17622278.

o     Book Chapters:

Bouchard, C., and Shephard, R. J. (1994). Physical activity fitness and health: the model and key concepts. In C. Bouchard, R. J. Shephard and T. Stephens (Eds.), Physical activity fitness and health: International proceedings and consensus statement (pp. 77-88). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

o     Books:

Bouchard, C., Blair, S. N., and Haskell, W. L. (2007). Physical activity and health. Champaign, Ill.: Human Kinetics.

o     Report:

World Health Organization. (1998). Promoting Active Living in and through Schools: Policy Statement and Guidelines for Action. May 1998. Esbjerg, Denmark: World Health Organization.

o     Thesis:

Card, N. (1996). Validation of a new double-inert gas non-rebreathe method for the determination of cardiac output. Unpublished Masters of Science, York University, Toronto.

o    Electronic citation:

Canadian Diabetes Association. (2007). The prevalence and cost of diabetes.   Retrieved September 3, 2007, from http://www.diabetes.ca/Section_About/prevalence.asp

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published elsewhere, is original and has been written by the stated authors. The article is not currenlty being considered for publication by any other journal.

  2. The submitted article is in the recommended format (stylistic and bibliographic) for the journal.
  3. The manuscript under consideration in Microsoft Word file format.

  4. Appropriate spelling and grammatical checks have been performed.
  5. Please provide the email addresses and names of at least three potential reviewers. Please enter this information into the comments section for the editor on our online system.

  6. As the submitting author, you confirm that all other authors (if applicable) have read and approved this article for submission fo the Health & Fitness Journal of Canada.
 

Copyright Notice

Terms of Publication

Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:

  • Authors retain copyright and grant the Health & Fitness Journal of Canada’s right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.
  • Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.
  • Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See The Effect of Open Access).
  • The Contributor (author(s)) represents and guarantees that the Contributor is the sole proprietor of the work and the Contributor has full power to make this Agreement and grant that the work does not infringe the copyright or other proprietary right of any other person; and the work contains no libellous or other unlawful matter and makes no improper invasion of the privacy of any other person. The Contributor also represents and is responsible for the accuracy of the work.
  • The Contributor will read, correct, and return promptly galleys and page proofs to the Editor (or designate). The Contributor will be responsible for the completeness and accuracy of these corrections. If the Contributor does not return galleys and page proofs within the schedule agreed upon with the Editor (or designate), the Publisher may proceed without the Contributor corrections.
  • When applicable, the Contributor agrees to obtain written permissions and letters of agreement for all matter contained in the work that is protected by existing copyright, paying any permission fees for the use of text or illustrations controlled by others, and furnishing the Publisher with written evidence of the copyright owner’s authorization to use the material.
  • When applicable, the Contributor agrees to obtain written permission for inclusion of any photographic materials involving a human subject, and provide the Publisher with written evidence of the subject’s authorization to use this material. In the case of subjects who have not reached the age of majority, the Contributor agrees to obtain and furnish the Publisher with written permission from the parent and/or legal guardian.
  • The Contributor may draw on and refer to material in the work in preparing other articles for publication in scholarly and professional journals and papers for delivery at professional meetings, provided that credit is given to the work and to the Publisher.
  • This agreement may not be changed unless the Contributor and the Publisher agree to the change by means of a formal addendum signed by the Contributor and the Publisher’s representative.
  • This agreement shall be construed and governed according to the laws of the province of British Columbia and shall be binding upon the parties hereto, their heirs, successors, assigns, and personal representatives. Should any formal proceedings related to this agreement be brought, such formal proceeding may be brought only in the province of British Columbia.

By submitting an article to the Health & Fitness Journal of Canada the Contributor has accepted and agreed to all terms outlined in the copyright notice.

 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.